Dangerous Dreamers of the Day

I have been thinking lately about a quote by T. E. Lawrence, known to many as Lawrence of Arabia. It goes like this: “All men [sic] dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds, wake in the day to find that it was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men [sic], for they may act on their dreams with open eyes, to make them possible.”

T. E. Lawrence is reminding us that not only does it matter how we choose to act moment to moment, it matters what we can and are willing to imagine with our choices. It matters what we can dream, what we can create in our imaginations. Can we, do we, engage in a rich imagination that can reach into the present and shape the life process?

I remember a particular lecture given by Yogi Bhajan in 1999. He spoke of upcoming events when the world would move towards ever increasing polarities. Tolerance and compromise would become scarce, and tragic events would happen that were unthinkable to each of us sitting there. His words seemed out of sync as we listened, but the unfolding of history has proven him right.

The future, Yogi Bhajan said, was in the hands of those who could lead with new ideas, new visions in education, environment, food, and the welfare of all beings. Nothing would change, he reminded us, if we only wished it so. Change comes from the one who can imagine vividly and the one who is willing to act on that vision.

There are no limits to what one can dream. Actions by comparison can seem small, tedious, even monotonous. Dreams require a constant attending to by the repetition of each moment’s choice; they need to be lived out in the consistent daily exchanges of this day and the next.

The world is in need of more dangerous dreamers. What is our dream for this planet and its inhabitants? And how committed are we to the persistent actions that make that dream possible?

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Entering

It’s hard to miss. Another New Year has called us to social celebration and quiet reflection. We can feel the turning of time and with it the longing for meaningful change. We are in touch with hope, with possibility, and with failure. We are reminded of what might be different or at least a little better in our lives, in our world, in our character. And for most of us, this hope turns into resolutions.

There is much written about how to make resolutions, how to succeed at keeping resolutions, or how to not have any resolutions at all. We forget that there is no right way or even one way to enter the New Year. As much as we read the “how to’s” and the “what’s”, this is OUR life, and we are mortal.

Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Surrender (Part 2)

In his poem called Tripping Over Joy, the poet Hafiz gives us much to reflect on regarding surrender. He portrays life as a chess game with the Divine. Most of us, he notes, take playing the game much too seriously. We can feel this seriousness in the rigidity of our shoulders or the tight set of our jaw. We can feel it in a sudden outburst of emotional turbulence. The mystic, he notes, has a very different experience.

Continue reading

Posted in The Yamas & Niyamas | 2 Comments

Surrender (Part 1)

“Don’t look for peace. Don’t look for any other state than the one you are in now; otherwise, you will set up inner conflict and unconscious resistance. Forgive yourself for not being at peace. The moment you completely accept your non-peace, your non-peace becomes transmuted into peace. Anything you accept fully will get you there, will take you into peace. This is the miracle of surrender.” ― Eckhart Tolle

Do you ever feel guilty for having moments of deep happiness, like somehow you missed the part where the world is falling apart? Or, do you ever feel guilty because you are caught in despair and hopelessness, like somehow you aren’t being spiritual enough?

Continue reading

Posted in The Yamas & Niyamas | Leave a comment

Self-Study (Part 2)

“Know yourself as a breathing being.” -Pandit Rajmani Tigunait

What comes to your mind as you hear these words from Pandit Rajmani? I am taken back to my years in seminary, sitting in my Old Testament class. The story that comes to mind is from Genesis 2, where God fashioned a human being out of the dust of the earth and then breathed into this being the breath of life.

In this story, there is an image of tenderness as the human being is carefully crafted. There is also a grace-filled intimacy as breath is breathed into this being. And it doesn’t end there, for as we know one breath doesn’t keep us alive for very long. We require a continuous sustenance of this intimate gift we call breath.

Continue reading

Posted in The Yamas & Niyamas | Leave a comment

Self-Study: Who Am I? (Part 1)

“Who are you God, and who am I?” – St Francis of Assisi

I would like to share a poem written by a fifth grade girl that I know well and who brings joy and wonderment to my life. She requested that I use her nickname, Shadow.

Who Am I?                      

” I was brought into this world wondering why I’m here.

I was brought into this world wondering who I was.

Continue reading

Posted in The Yamas & Niyamas | Leave a comment

Tapas: the Heat of Self-Discipline [Part 2]

“Take your medicine first.” – Narvada Puri

 The word medicine conjures up many unpleasant memories from my childhood. I can almost taste the medicine my parents gave me when I was sick so that I would feel better. They always tried to hide the taste of the medicine in a spoonful of sugar, but as far as I was concerned, it didn’t work.

I have had to sit and reflect on these words spoken by one of my beloved teachers in an attempt to get past my unpleasant memories and into her simple wisdom. Perhaps she was speaking to the things we ignore on a daily basis pretending they don’t need our attention. They seem unpleasant, like bad tasting medicine, and are often simple things like balancing the checkbook, cleaning the closet, or calling the dentist.

Continue reading

Posted in The Yamas & Niyamas | Leave a comment

Tapas: the Heat of Self-Discipline (Part I)

“Practice that ignites our inner fire, brings out our inner radiance, and makes us vibrant and energetic is tapas.” -Pandit Rajmani Tigunait

Who of us would not like to have more vibrancy and inner glow? After all, isn’t this the quality that attracts us to others, especially babies of any species? We are drawn irresistibly to this life force that desires to radiate from all of us. This is the source of health, vibrancy, intelligence, joy, and mental acuity.

Continue reading

Posted in The Yamas & Niyamas | Leave a comment